Flame retardants, commonly added to foam, electronics and building materials, are an environmental hazard, especially for young children. Toxicological studies indicate that certain flame retardants may affect brain development. A team of interdisciplinary OSU researchers received pilot project funding from the Environmental Health Sciences Center Pilot Project program to investigate if exposure to flame retardants affected children's neurological and cognitive performance. The study, titled "Effect of Flame Retardants and Home Environment on Children's School Readiness" worked with 100 preschool-aged children in Corvallis and Bend, OR. 

For the study, each child wore a passive wristband sampler for one week. These wristbands are capable of measuring thousands of chemicals.

The research team also collected household dust samples, and evaluated the children for various behavioral and neurological benchmarks. Upon analysis of results, the researchers returned data back to the families in the form of a report with their findings. 

 

In the News

Public Health Researchers Team up on Flame Retardant Study 

Meet the Researchers

Kim Anderson, PhD

College of Agriculture

Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology

Molly Kile, ScD

College of Public Health and Human Sciences

Department of Public Health

Shannon Lipscomb, PhD

College of Public Health and Human Sciences

Department of Human Development and Family Sciences

OSU-Cascades

Megan MacDonald, PhD

College of Public Health and Human Sciences

Department of Exercise and Sports Science

Megan McClelland, PhD

College of Public Health and Human Sciences 

Department of Human Development and Family Sciences